Forces of Evil

bealtainecottage.com 002

There is so much happening in the world at present that many of you are struggling to keep abreast of all the doom and gloom, with the war machine ramping up into full steam ahead and governments failing to really listen to the will of the people.

bealtainecottage.com 001

Of course it is as much about money, power and control, as all the previous slaughter on this struggling little planet. Make no mistake, there are forces of evil at work…and they are ALL man made…there is NOTHING supernatural about them!

bealtainecottage.com 003

The bigger picture is, as it always was, about life on this small, perfectly designed  and formed Sacred Earth.

bealtainecottage.com 006

This is what is important…the sacredness of Mother Earth.

How much longer can the Great Mother tolerate the slash and burn tactics used by the criminal elite?

bealtainecottage.com 007

When governments and government funded (through tax breaks) corporations, are not slashing and burning the Earth, they are usurping the natural world away from the people they are supposed to serve and represent, by privatizing and corporatizing OUR natural resources.

bealtainecottage.com 014

This is not about  protecting Sacred Earth, but creating fiefdoms to harness all the resources of Mother Earth into a vast monster, that is regarded as unassailable and protected by the very laws meant to protect us from such iniquities. 

bealtainecottage.com 008

So when I refer to this madness as “Forces of Evil,” I am not exaggerating…for evil is not a part of the natural world, but a dark, malevolent force of great destruction created by Man!

bealtainecottage.com 012

Evil must be resisted…always.

For my part, I am never afraid of evil, but simply contemptuous of it…it is not to be tolerated!

Permaculture Cottage ~ Dividing Rhubarb, Growing Trees and Composting!

Lots of the rhubarb has been lifted and divided recently and planted into the new beds, all loaded with fresh compost from the heaps stacked last year.

Rhubarb is an easy and early fruiting plant to grow. Although the leaves are toxic, various parts of the plants have medicinal and culinary uses.  In culinary use, fresh raw stalks are crisp (similar to celery) with a strong tart taste; most commonly the plant’s stalks are cooked and used in pies and other foods for their tart flavour. Personally, there is nothing equal to a Rhubarb Crumble, or, one of my absolute favourites…Rhubarb Jam!

Did you know that in England, the first rhubarb of the year is harvested by candlelight in dark sheds dotted around the noted “Rhubarb Triangle” of Wakefield, Leeds, and Morley,a practice that produces a sweeter, more tender stalk?

The New Vegetable Beds

The new beds are coming along well…planted out with Chard, Cucumber, Parsley, Tomato and Chives…for starters! I have spread wood ash recently on the beds and continue to build up with compost.

Chard can be harvested while the leaves are young and tender, or after maturity, when they are larger and have slightly tougher stems. Raw chard is perishes quite fast, so it’s best to pick only when about to be used!

Chard has shiny green ribbed leaves, with stems that range from white to yellow to red, depending on the cultivar. It has a slightly bitter taste. Fresh young chard can be used raw in salads. Mature chard leaves and stalks are typically cooked  or sautéed; their bitterness fades with cooking, leaving a refined flavor which is more delicate than that of cooked Spinach. I use Chard a lot in my home made soups and curries and as a replacement for Spinach.

Flowering Oregano and Chives

Both grow like weeds here at Bealtaine Cottage, with lots of Oregano now coming up in the gravel driveway. Great for drying and using in sauces and soups and breads!

More Trees Please!

Trees are planted all the year around here at the smallholding. Many are grown from seed and potted on several times before eventual planting out. Many are rescued from the roadside verges and gravel paths. Lots of these trees are given away to those who show an interest in planting. There is one thing for sure though, the Earth needs more trees. Trees protect her.

Compost this morning at Bealtaine

Now working through the second heap and already filled up the first again, so am busy as you can see!

Composting as a recognized practice dates to at least the early Roman Empire since Pliny the Elder (AD 23-79).

Traditionally, composting was to pile organic materials until the next planting season, at which time the materials would have decayed enough to be ready for use in the soil. This is the method I follow and it works every time as you can see!  The advantage of this method is that little working time or effort is required from the composter and it fits in naturally with agricultural practices in temperate climates. Personally I see no disadvantages in this technique. There is no real exposure to excessive rainfall, as the heaps are thatched with lots of straw to overwinter in peace and harmony with all the hibernating insects and frogs!

Bealtaine Cottage is also on YouTube…with over 85 videos about Permaculture, planting, growing and living.

Visitors to Bealtaine Cottage are welcomed free.

Donations are always welcome.

Thank you!

Thank you for supporting this blog