How to Make a Biodegradable Willow Wreath…easy and free!

Cut a range of willow stems, including Dogwood and any other bendy shrubs or woods you can easily access and lay them on the floor to grade them in length.

Take a long length of green willow and made a circle, twisting the spare of the length around the circle.

Following this,  insert another long length as you can see, and twist this around the circle.

Twisting long lengths to start the circle, strengthens the hoop and makes it easier to follow on with shorter pieces.

You can keep adjusting the circle to make it as round as possible.

The willow will bend and shape quite readily.

Keep adding in lengths, inserting the thick end in between the woven lengths.

Excess pieces of willow can be snipped off as you go or at the end of the work.

Try to keep the shape balanced by rotating the wreath, not inserting the thick ends all into the same part of the circle.

I use garden cutters to trim the thick ends of the willow.

Start to add the colourful willow slips.

You can also use any bendy plant strips and even fresh Bamboo.

Take time to experiment with as many garden materials as you can find!

If it grows and is fresh cut, then it’s fine to use as it will be pliable.

Now add the red Dogwood…

Keep winding.

Keep twisting.

Make the wreath thick and chunky, as it will make a good decoration base all the year round and last for years to come.

The wreath continues to be pushed into shape, making it rounder.

The wreath is now ready for decorating.

This willow wreath is 100% biodegradable and will last for years to come.

You can redecorate it as many times as you please!

Adding Larch

Larch is associated with integrity and vision.

It is also for protection, so lends itself well to a front door wreath.

Adding Birch

Birch is for healing and cleansing and Willow is magical and powerful, so already, we have a triad of good energies balanced within this Christmas, midwinter wreath.

Adding Ivy…symbol of the spiral path of the Self

I cut several long trails of Ivy to wrap around the wreath…symbolizing aspects of the journey of the self and new experiences.

You can probably begin to see and feel the powerful energy from this Circle of Willow and Nature!

The wreath is now complete.

All that remains is to add some more seasonal decorations of your choice.

This is how I finished mine…

What a beautiful welcome!

dsc04154dsc04151dsc04156Here’s another I made recently as a gift for a friend…

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How To Make A Willow Wigwam Plant Support…for Free!

Place a tyre on the ground.

This acts as a guide to the size of the wigwam.

Insert poles of Willow, Hazel or Ash into the ground around the tyre…it helps if the ground is soft!

Tie the poles together at the top, string will do, but I use a few thin ‘whips’ of Willow!

Now, you can begin weaving…

Starting with a long stem of Willow, begin to weave in and out between the poles.

Each strip woven in will begin to strengthen the support.

You can experiment with different weaves, but working with 2 lengths at a time, twisting together between each pole will make it VERY strong!

It starts to come together!

Mistakes are easily undone and made good…take heart.

My strong advice is to experiment to find the technique that suits you best…try using other materials as well!

Once the structure is fairly sound, you can continue the weave up to the top, like this, or weave separate rings into it.

Personally, I like to spiral the Willow upwards towards the top, using double lengths and twisting twice between poles.

Gently remove the poles from around the tyre…

And here’s the finished project.

Willow wigwam in a permaculture garden in February