Abundance in the Edible Gardens Today.

Cloud and rain, interspersed with brilliant sunshine as the gardens move into their total abundance period as we approach midsummer.

A cold wind is blowing from the East, but the edible gardens are well sheltered with the warm micro-climate protected by the abundance of growth in the trees, hedging and shrubs.

These are the plants near my desk inside the cottage, on a north-facing window ledge.

I’m heading outside to embrace the morning, armed with tea and camera, followed by two cats…Jack and Flo have already been out for their walk!

Looking back at the cottage before I move through the Laurel Arch and into the Edible Gardens.

I love the colours on the Purple Beech as the leaves collide with the Rosa Rugosa, Sedge and vibrant, lime-green Crocosmia Montbretia!

Willow archways continue to strengthen as the new growth develops.

There are masses of Blackcurrants and Jostaberries growing all around the Willow…appearing to enjoy the company.

Both tolerate shade and damp, in fact, thriving on it!

And then the sun explodes onto the gardens, making everything appear in glorious technicolour!

Lush and abundant, Nature puts forth her expression of sheer joy.

Birds sing and Bees buzz.

No Monsanto here, or Dow or any other enemies of Nature…they are banished!

Apples and soft fruits are plentiful, as they were before the invention of odious chemicals.

No sprays or any other form of ecocide.

Nature is well able to look after herself, for at Bealtaine Cottage, she is officially off the critical list and life support machine that is corporate greed!

Bees find their way from flower to flower in the permaculture gardens of Bealtaine Cottage.

Archways of roses that have cost nothing more than encouragement of a slip from a rose.

And paths of wild flowers and herbs that lead one towards the deepest and most intimate recesses of Nature…

12 replies »

  1. Pingback: Gold Within
  2. Another inspirational post to keep me going, my garden and allotment are producing almost nothing this year, it must be me and / or the weather my poor little seeds probably drowned and those that didn’t are pigeon fodder!

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    • Learn from all that you are now analysing and make plans for sowing again. I raise all my stock on trays and pots, planting out when all are strong and vigorous! It’s all a learning curve. Netting against pigeons works well!
      Colx

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      • We have some little bug that loves pak choi, if you don’t cover with fleece it gets chomped off. When I feel cheesed off I just look at what you produce to be re enthused!, thanks for the tips.

        R

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