Yuletide Celebrations

Yuletide is an ancient celebration.

Midwinter mist at Bealtaine CottageAs the mist encircles the cottage this morning and the stillness of the air creates echoes along the hill, Midwinter seems very close.

Painted Irish dresser at Bealtaine CottageThis is traditionally a time for people to come together and celebrate the midwinter, with feasting, music and dancing.

I have been busy painting and decorating the cottage in preparation for this special time.

Even the old dresser has been given a much needed coat of paint!

Mist and trees in the permaculture gardens at Bealtaine CottageYule is traditionally celebrated over twelve days.

This is where the Twelve days of Christmas come from.

It is also traditional to have a Yule log which will burn all night, on the longest night of the year.

The barn is filled with logs for the stoves.

Most of the wood comes from fast growing Ash, a tree which grows easily here in the west of Ireland.

Wood burning stove at Bealtaine CottageLight is important at this time and this is where the idea of Christmas lights comes from.

Opening the doors of the wood burning stove in the sitting room, allows light to fill the room.

There are many celebrations of light all across the world at this time.

Irish dresser in the cottage kitchen at Bealtaine CottageWe are drawn towards the light, in this time of darkness and mellow sunlight.

The winter will have reached it’s shortest day this week.

The Barn at Bealtaine Cottage, midwinter 2012 A time to celebrate, keep warm and look forward to the ascent towards Spring.

Veranda at Bealtaine Cottage, midwinter 2012Make the most of this beautiful aspect of the year, wrap up warm and spent time outdoors.

There is beauty in every day…and it allows you to appreciate the warmth of your home.

Happy Yuletide, everyone!

One thought on “Yuletide Celebrations

  1. Colette – This is yet another interesting and indeed informative blog. As someone who spent almost 30 years away from my native Ireland and living in New Zealand, where the climate in December is generally hot; my Yuletide season was usually celebrated outdoors. Having returned a few years ago to finally settle in my home town – its nice to re-learn about long forgotten Celtic, and European Yuletide customs and traditions.
    Thank you for illustrating that special information with images of your beloved Bealtaine.
    **********************************
    Traditions and customs are what binds communities and people. It is fascinating that many pre-date organized religion as such and we tend not to be mindful of the powerful role played by the natural cycles which are all around us, yet we do not notice. I’m off out to collect the green!
    Yuletide happiness to you on these short days
    Colx

    Like

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